The Widow’s Web

Each moment in life is like an anvil struck by a hammer
Each experience involves a thousand sparks spraying the consciousness
With a brilliant, luminous, colorful shower
Providing the memory with a landscape of expansiveness

Sadly, each spark lasts only a moment
As each of us is merely a temporal transient
But this is the story of a second in a widow’s web
That caused the transient’s despair to ebb

Two dudes were staggering down the street
Not cognizant of who they’d meet
Not knowing the nature of the coming encounter
That would be had on two sides of a bartender’s counter

They thought they’d sit and order a beer
But they were served a dish of beauty and cheer
The hot dish moved back and forth with the steps of a panther
Delight sprang from each step as the boys dialed up their amorous blather
They could do nothing but feebly verbalize their utter enchantment
At the beautiful soul encased in the body of an Olympic contestant
Adorned with hoops of gold, a ringlet of obsidian, and a jacket displaying eighty two
Trust me, just looking at her will convince you that she thinks the world of you
And when you’ve been convinced, she will smile
Something no woman has done to you in a while

But this widow isn’t just some type of spider
There is something infinitely grand and powerful inside her
She once was the wife of a man now with God above
No stranger to the pleasure and pain of two dancing in love
And to two children she is a mother
But does she lack a friend, a lover, a husband, or a brother?

These thoughts beset him as he let himself be dragged to Mexico
By a frantic and hysterical horse named Hidalgo
Will she be a spark in a shower consumed by night?
Are his plans for the future just a kneejerk of panicked flight?
If not, then who would this widow be?
Now that his failure to Noah has destroyed his destiny
And he is truly free
From his own identity

3 thoughts on “The Widow’s Web

  1. Really wonderful. The philosophical introduction was just the right length. Then the story is very interesting. I’m wondering how I might read it if I didn’t know you. Have to try reading it again more neutrally.

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  2. Okay I read it again. And none of it requires any personal knowledge except the name Noah used instead of something like “his last lover” so I think I read it just like everyone else will. It’s really well-done.
    Sent from my iPhone

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